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Stock Market Today: October 8th - 12th, 2018

Discussion in 'Stock Market Today' started by bigbear0083, Oct 6, 2018.

  1. bigbear0083

    bigbear0083 Content Manager
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    Welcome Stockaholics to the trading week of October 8th!

    This past week saw the following moves in the S&P:
    [​IMG]


    Major Indices End of Week:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Bird's Eye view of the Major Futures Markets on Friday:
    [​IMG]


    Economic Calendar for the Week Ahead:
    [​IMG]


    Sector Performance WTD, MTD, YTD:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    What to Watch in the Week Ahead:

    T.B.A.
     
    The Great Gatsby and T0rm3nted like this.
  2. bigbear0083

    bigbear0083 Content Manager
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    Small Caps, Semis Smashed; Homebuilders Hammered Amid Greatest Jobs Data In 49 Years
    We suspect more than a few traders will be saying this tonight...


    A big week...

    • Unemployment Rate at 49 year lows

    • US Stocks - worst 2-day drop since May

    • Small Caps, Nasdaq - biggest weekly drop in 7 months

    • Small Caps - biggest 5-week drop since Nov 2016

    • China (closed) ETF - biggest weekly drop in 7 months

    • Semis - biggest weekly drop in 6 months

    • FANGs - biggest weekly drop in 7 months

    • Homebuilders - worst.losing.streak.ever...

    • USD Index - best week in 2 months

    • HY Bonds - biggest weekly price drop in 8 months

    • IG Bonds - biggest weekly drop since Nov 2016

    • Treasury Yields - biggest weekly yield spike in 8 months

    • Yield Curve - biggest weekly steepening in 8 months

    • Gold - best weekly gain in 6 weeks


    Chinese stocks were closed for Golden Week but the China ETF slumped...

    [​IMG]

    European Stocks tumbled on the week...

    [​IMG]




    US Small Caps stocks were the worst - though Nasdaq was close - suffering their biggest drop since March...Even The Dow gave up early week gains...

    [​IMG]

    Small Caps - down 4 of the last 5 weeks (the biggest 5-week drop since Nov 2016 - Trump Election) - broke the most below their critical technical support 50DMA since May... but bounced off its 200DMA today...

    [​IMG]





    The S&P bounced off its 50DMA...

    [​IMG]

    The Dow-Small Caps divergence remains yuuge... (the last 5 weeks have been the biggest divergence since Sept 2011)

    [​IMG]

    Semis slaughtered...

    [​IMG]

    FANGs f##ked...

    [​IMG]

    Banks bid but weak...

    [​IMG]

    But homebuilders are getting hammered - down 13 days in a row...lowest since April 2017.

    [​IMG]

    TSLA tumbled back into the red, giving up all those post-SEC gains...

    [​IMG]

    VIX exploded above 17...

    [​IMG]

    And the VIX curve inverted...

    [​IMG]



    But GE had its best week since 2009!!

    [​IMG]



    IG and HY bond prices plunged this week...

    [​IMG]



    But while stocks caught a lot of eyes, bonds were really where the bloodbath hit...

    [​IMG]

    Don't forget Bonds are closed on Monday (Columbus Day)

    Treasury volatility exploded from record lows this week...

    [​IMG]



    Breaking bond yields to multi-year highs...

    [​IMG]



    The yield curve exploded this week - steepening most since February...

    [​IMG]



    The Dollar managed solid gains on the week but slipped in the latter half...

    [​IMG]



    Cryptos ended mostly lower amid low volatility with only Ether managing very modest gains...

    [​IMG]



    WTI and Gold managed gains on the week despite dollar strength as silver and copper slipped...

    [​IMG]



    Gold managed to hold above $1200...and WTI above $74

    [​IMG]



    Finally, as is increasingly occurring here, we give Gluskin Sheff's David Rosenberg the last words...

    [​IMG]
    David [email protected]


    "There's no reason to think that the probability of a recession in the next year or two is at all elevated" (Powell, Oct. 18); "The Federal Reserve is not currently forecasting a recession" (Bernanke, Jan. 2008); <1/3>

    11:16 AM - Oct 5, 2018
    Twitter Ads info and privacy


    [​IMG]
    David [email protected]

    Replying to @EconguyRosie

    “We don't have the capability of reliably forecasting a recession” (Greenspan, Dec. 2000) <2/3>

    11:16 AM - Oct 5, 2018
    Twitter Ads info and privacy


    [​IMG]
    David [email protected]

    Replying to @EconguyRosie

    Those last tweets can simply be labelled “famous last words” <3/3>

    11:16 AM - Oct 5, 2018
    Twitter Ads info and privacy
     
  3. bigbear0083

    bigbear0083 Content Manager
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    Authored by Lance Roberts via RealInvestmentAdvice.com,

    Earlier this week, Eddy Elfenbein has an interesting post discussing the “Bull Market In Dividends.”

    “For the third quarter, dividends from the S&P 500 grew by 10.96%. That’s the strongest growth rate in more than three years. It’s the 34th quarter in a row of dividend growth.

    Over the last eight years, dividends are up 234%, which is pretty close to what the S&P 500 price index has done.

    Considering how simple it is, the S&P 500 has tracked a 2% dividend yield fairly closely for the last several years.”

    [​IMG]


    It is an interesting point particularly when you consider that there are a lot of dividends which have been “financed”through “cheap debt.” There is also the issue of record debt issuance by companies with marginal balance sheets at best or are walking “zombies” at worst.

    As John Coumarionos noted earlier this week.

    “Low interest rates have allowed companies that would have otherwise gone out of business to stay alive, and this has caused a tepid recovery. Chancellor notes the cumulative default rate on junk bonds during the entire recession was 17%, or “around half the level of the two previous downturns.” And while central bankers might view this as a victory, he views it as the cause of economic weakness.

    The lessons for investors are to remain vigilant about stock valuations and higher yielding bonds. At some point, the zombies will not be able to sustain themselves any longer.”

    This is an interesting point when you begin to think about the long-term history of dividends and what they represent with respect to long-term market cycles.

    Let’s start with the notion that “dividends always increase.”

    First, the statement is incorrect because during market reversion “cash dividends” DO NOT increase – but the YIELD does because of the collapse in prices.

    But, more to the point, that notion is only true, until it isn’t.

    During the 2008 financial crisis, more than 140 companies decreased or eliminated their dividends to shareholders. Yes, many of those companies were major banks, however, leading up to the financial crisis there were many individuals holding large allocations to banks for the income stream their dividends generated. In hindsight, that was not such a good idea.

    But it wasn’t just 2008. It also occurred dot.com bust in 2000. In both periods, while investors lost roughly 50% of their capital, dividends were also cut on average of 12%.

    [​IMG]

    Of course, it wasn’t EVERY company cutting dividends by 12%. Some didn’t. Many did, and some even eliminated their dividends entirely to protect creditors. The last point is the most important. For any company shareholders are a secondary concern. However, access to the debt market is a far more important consideration when it comes to financial decision making, who gets paid, and who doesn’t.

    Since 2009, due to the Federal Reserve’s suppression of interest rates, investors have piled into dividend yielding equities, regardless of fundamentals, due to the belief “there is no alternative.” The resulting “dividend chase” has pushed the valuations of dividend yielding companies to excessive levels disregarding underlying fundamental weakness.

    As with the “Nifty Fifty” heading into the 1970’s, the resulting outcome for investors was less than favorable. These periods are not isolated events. There is a high correlation between declines in asset prices and the actual dividends being paid out throughout history. The chart below shows the history of inflation-adjusted dividends and the S&P 500 going back to 1900. (Data courtesy of Dr. Robert Shiller.)


    [​IMG]

    The first thing to note is the extreme deviation of real annual dividends above their long-term linear growth trend. As you will notice is that such extensions have ALWAYS mean reverted throughout history. (In other words, the best time to BUY dividend yielding companies is when the dividend has deviated well below the long-term growth trend.)

    Here is another way to look at the same data. The chart below shows the percentage deviation above and below the 5-year average annual cash dividend. There are two things you should take note of.

    1. When deviations have exceeded a 20% deviation it has denoted very overvalued markets.

    2. Reversions below the 5-year average have been coincident with secular bear markets.
    [​IMG]

    Notice that the current deviation from the 5-year average has already started to decline which is coincident with the Federal Reserve rate hike campaign. Given that much of the dividend issuance was done through cheap debt over the last decade, it is not surprising that with rising rates, the rate of dividend issuances has begun to slow.

    Dividends may well already be telling us of a more troubling trend for investors is coming.

    While I completely agree that investors should own companies that pay dividends (as it is a significant portion of long-term total returns), it is also crucial to understand that companies can, and will, cut dividends during periods of financial stress. During the next major market reversion, we will see much of the same happen again.

    It is during these times when prices collapse, and dividends are slashed, the “I bought it for the dividend plan” doesn’t work out.

    EVERY investor has a point, when prices fall far enough, that regardless of the dividend being paid, they WILL capitulate and sell the position. This point generally comes when dividends have been cut and capital destruction has been maximized.

    Just something to think about as you catch up on your weekend reading list.

    Economy & Fed
    Markets
    Most Read On RIA
    Research / Interesting Reads
    “Any fool can buy a stock. It takes a smart investor to know when to sell.”Anonymous
     
  4. bigbear0083

    bigbear0083 Content Manager
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    Here are the percentage changes for the major indices for WTD, MTD, QTD & YTD in 2018-
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    S&P sectors for the past week-
    [​IMG]
     
  5. bigbear0083

    bigbear0083 Content Manager
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    October is the Best Month of Midterm Year
    [​IMG]
    October often evokes fear on Wall Street as memories are stirred of crashes in 1929, 1987, the 554-point drop on October 27, 1997, back-to-back massacres in 1978 and 1979, Friday the 13th in 1989 and the 733-point drop on October 15, 2008. During the week ending October 10, 2008, Dow lost 1,874.19 points (18.2%), the worst weekly decline in our database going back to 1901, in point and percentage terms. The term “Octoberphobia” has been used to describe the phenomenon of major market drops occurring during the month. Market calamities can become a self-fulfilling prophecy, so stay on the lookout and don’t get whipsawed if it happens.

    But October has become a turnaround month—a “bear killer” if you will. Twelve post-WWII bear markets have ended in October: 1946, 1957, 1960, 1962, 1966, 1974, 1987, 1990, 1998, 2001, 2002 and 2011 (S&P 500 declined 19.4%). However, eight were midterm bottoms. This year is a midterm year, but the market has been resilient thus far during the Worst Months which may temper full-month October results.

    Midterm election year Octobers are downright stellar thanks to the major turnarounds mentioned above; ranking number one on the Dow, S&P 500, NASDAQ, Russell 1000 and Russell 2000. This is also the beginning of the sweet spot of the four-year-presidential-election-cycle. The fourth quarter of the midterm years combines with the first and second quarters of the pre-election years for the best three consecutive quarter span for the market, averaging 20.4% for the Dow and 21.1% for the S&P 500 (since 1949), and an amazing 32.0% for NASDAQ (since 1971).
    [​IMG]
    October: A month that can deliver tricks and treats
    [​IMG]
    Historically speaking, the CBOE Volatility Index (VIX) tends to reach its seasonal high in the month of October. This may be due to the fact that the two worst performing months of the year, August and September (by average performance) precede it. October also has the honor of slaying twelve, post-WWII bear markets. A bear market’s low is frequently accompanied by high levels of fear and market volatility. VIX’s seasonal pattern can be seen in the following chart. October’s peak and July’s low are indicated by blue arrows.

    [​IMG]
    October’s volatility peak is also visible when actual daily percent changes are analyzed. October has hosted the most daily moves in excess of 1%, 2%, 3%, 5%, 7% and even 10% since 1930. Do not fret over the nine times S&P 500 has moved more than 10% in a single day. Six of the nine occurrences were way back in the 1930’s. Only three have occurred more recently and out of those, two were actually positive days (10/13/2008 +11.58% and 10/28/2008 +10.79%). Actually only two of the nine days with moves in excess of 10% were negative days: 3/18/1935 –10.06% and 10/19/1987 –20.47%.
    [​IMG]
    Typical October Trading: Forget about “Octoberphobia”
    [​IMG]
    October has a questionable reputation due to its history of hosting major market selloffs and crashes. However, October, especially in midterm years, has been a stellar performer on average and is the top month of midterm years since 1950. October is also the only month in which DJIA has gained more than 1000 points, twice. In 2011 DJIA soared 1041.63 points (9.5%) and in 2015 DJIA rocketed 1379.54 points (8.5%). Looking at the full month of October (chart above) one day at time the only area of weakness over the recent 21-year period has been on trading days five through seven. The rest of the month has been solid. Small-caps, measured by Russell 2000, do tend to under-perform, but still end October with an average gain of nearly 1%.

    LEI-ding the Way to No Recession

    The Conference Board’s Leading Economic Index (LEI) is one of our favorite economic indicators. It is designed to predict future movements in the economy based on a composite of 10 economic indicators (like manufacturers’ new orders, stock prices, and weekly unemployment claims) whose changes tend to precede shifts in the overall economy. Last week, it painted a continued strong backdrop for future economic growth, as it rose 0.4% month-over-month and 6.4% year-over-year (YoY).

    Looking under the hood, the LEI has risen or been flat for 27 consecutive months, just topping the streak of 26 months that ended in 2011. This is now the longest streak without a drop in the LEI since the mid-1980s. While the yield curve has been getting all the attention recently, all recessions going back to the early 1970s first saw the LEI turn negative YoY; and because of its solid track record of predicting recessions, the LEI is a component of LPL Research’s Five Forecasters.

    As our LPL Chart of the Day shows, the LEI is nowhere near turning negative currently.

    [​IMG]

    “The fact that the LEI has been very successful at forecasting recessions, and is one of the few forward-looking economic indicators, makes it one of our favorites. The strong recent data suggests a recession is nowhere in sight and signals solid underlying fundamentals in the U.S. economy,” said Ryan Detrick, LPL senior market strategist.

    Lastly, here are all seven recessions going back to early 1970. As you can see, the LEI turned negative year-over-year on average eight months (with a median of six months) before a recession officially took place. That is what we call a nice track record. Again, with the LEI up 6.4% year-over-year, we are a long way from this economic indicator flashing any major recession warning.

    What Can The Strong Third Quarter Tell Us About The Fourth Quarter?

    The surprise summer rally continued in September, as the S&P 500 Index gained for the sixth consecutive month. The third quarter is usually volatile, but this year it was one of the calmest ever, with the S&P 500 not closing up or down 1% on a single day. It last did that in 1963!

    “The S&P 500 is up six months in a row, but the bulls might be interested in knowing that the fourth quarter of a midterm year has historically been the best quarter out of the entire four-year presidential cycle,” explained Senior Market Strategist Ryan Detrick.

    It doesn’t end there though, as the first and second quarters of a pre-election year have posted the second and third strongest returns on average, respectively. In other words, the next three quarters have been the strongest out of the entire presidential cycle.

    [​IMG]

    What about the big gain stocks sported in the third quarter? Historically, the third quarter is the worst quarter — but that sure wasn’t the case this year with an impressive 7.2% run-up for the S&P 500. Well, this could be another great sign for bulls, as the fourth quarter has often been stronger after big third-quarter gains.

    As our LPL Chart of the Day shows, after the third quarter gains more than 7% (like it did in 2018), the fourth quarter has finished green 13 out of the past 14 times. Adding to that momentum, the returns going out both two quarters and four quarters historically have seen stronger than average returns.

    [​IMG]

    Should We Fear October?

    Here it comes, the scary month of October. Many investors have bad memories of this month, mainly because it has had some spectacular crashes. In particular, 1929, 1987, and 2008 are a few of the years that saw October scar investors for a long, long time.

    Here’s some good news: Over the past 20 years, the S&P 500 Index has shown a higher average return in October than in any other month. And the good news continues. This is a midterm year and, sure enough, midterm years have actually been quite strong for stocks. “Incredibly, since 1982, the scary month of October has seen stocks fall only once during a midterm year. Not to mention it has been the best month overall going clear back to 1950 for all midterm years,” explained Senior Market Strategist Ryan Detrick.

    As our LPL Chart of the Day shows, October has been up 3.3% on average during a midterm year, ranking it as the best-performing month–ahead of the usually bullish months of November and December.

    [​IMG]

    Weak Earnings Reactions
    Oct 5, 2018

    Most people are probably familiar with the Green Day song, “Wake Me When September Ends,” but in this case a more appropriate term may be “Wake Me When Earnings Season Ends.” While this past September was positive for the S&P 500, companies reporting earnings faced pretty brutal initial reactions. Of the 109 companies reporting earnings in September, the average one-day reaction to their earnings reports was a decline of 1.2%, and in the second half of the month, things were even worse. Of the 43 companies that reported in the second half of September, the average one-day reaction to earnings was a decline of 3.5% with only eight having positive initial reactions. While October has only just begun, things don’t look to be coming in much better as stocks like Stitch Fix (SFIX), Acuity Brands (AYI), and Cal-Maine (CALM) have all declined more than 5% in reaction to earnings, while only two stocks traded up (LW and PAYX).

    Using our Earnings Report Screener, which is available to all Institutional clients, we ran a screen of how stocks reporting earnings in September have historically reacted to earnings going back to 2002. This is just one of the many useful screens clients can run using this invaluable tool.

    As shown in the chart, the average one-day decline of 1.2% for companies reporting earnings in September wasn’t the worst of any year in our database, but it was the fourth weakest. The only other Septembers where stocks saw weaker one-day reactions to earnings were in 2015 (-2.49%), 2008 (-1.45%), and 2016 (-1.37%). The key question now is whether the weakness we have seen in reaction to earnings so far is a preview of what’s to come during the actual earnings season that runs from 10/10 through mid-November.

    [​IMG]
    Consumer Comfort Makes Another High
    Oct 4, 2018

    The Bloomberg Consumer Comfort Index has once again made another new high for the current cycle rising to 61.6 from last week’s 61.2. Not only is it an impressive release for the current cycle, but it is also at the highest level since the final days of 2000— one year after the index had hit its all-time highs. This data echoes a jump in bullish sentiment among individual investors that was also released earlier today. Optimism seems to be growing across the board.
    [​IMG]

    Breaking the report down further into demographics, politics has had a strong impact on comfort readings. As you can see in the chart below, the party in power typically boosts comfort among its members and vice versa. Republicans currently top the chart with the highest comfort of all groups. The most recent release actually posted the highest comfort in the history of the survey (since 1990) for Republicans. Meanwhile, Democrats’ comfort is unsurprisingly significantly lower. Despite this, this group’s comfort has actually been climbing for several weeks now to its highest level since June. Drama over Supreme Court justices amid the wider trend of political polarization has not necessarily slowed consumer comfort on either side of the aisle.

    [​IMG]

    Looking at income levels, there is a clear split at $50k. Income earners between $75K to $99.9K are sitting at their all-time high in terms of confidence, while the $100K and over group is not far behind. On the other hand, those making under $50K understandably have a much lower comfort level, but they are not at historically low readings. Incomes between $15K and $24.9K are currently in the lowest percentile of all demographics, while the lowest income demographic of under $15k actually sits in the 91st percentile only 0.7 points from its all-time high.

    Some other honorable mentions are the homeowners, who despite weak housing market data claimed comfort in the 99th percentile. Conversely, renters are sitting relatively low on the list. Married individuals are within one point of their all-time high alongside college-educated individuals. There is also a discrepancy between comfort levels among men (70.3) and women (53.3).

    [​IMG]

    Divergent Start to October
    Oct 4, 2018

    Below is a snapshot of asset class performance to start the month of October. We also include performance over the last month and year-to-date.

    The month has gotten off to a pretty strange start, with equity ETFs going in different directions. Small-cap ETFs have gotten hit very hard, while large-caps are in the green. Both consumer sectors are in the red, with Consumer Discretionary (XLY) off by 2% already. On the upside, Energy (XLE), Financials (XLF), and Industrials (XLI) have seen a wave of buying.

    Outside of the US, Brazil (EWZ) is already up 9% in October, while India (PIN) is down more than 3%. Prior to September, India had been performing relatively well this year, but an 11.85% drop over the last month has sunk the country’s equity market deep into the red. China (ASHR), Hong Kong (EWH), and Mexico (EWW) are all down more than 2% this month already as well.

    Commodities ETFs are on fire, especially energy-related ones. Oil (USO) is up 3.6% month-to-date, while natural gas (UNG) is up 8%. Finally, Treasury ETFs have fallen quite a bit so far in October as interest rates have broken out higher.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. bigbear0083

    bigbear0083 Content Manager
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    Stock Market Analysis Video for October 5th, 2018
    Video from AlphaTrends Brian Shannon


    ShadowTrader Video Weekly 10.7.18 - Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'
    Video from ShadowTrader Peter Reznicek
     
  7. bigbear0083

    bigbear0083 Content Manager
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    Here are the current major indices pullback/correction levels from ATHs as of week ending 10.5.18-
    [​IMG]

    Here is also the pullback/correction levels from current prices-
    [​IMG]

    ...and here are the rally levels from current prices-
    [​IMG]
     
  8. bigbear0083

    bigbear0083 Content Manager
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    [​IMG]

    Here are the upcoming IPO's for this week-

    [​IMG]
     
  9. bigbear0083

    bigbear0083 Content Manager
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    Stockaholics come join us on our stock market competitions for this upcoming trading week ahead!-

    ========================================================================================================
    ========================================================================================================

    It would be pretty sweet to see some of you join us and participate on these!

    I hope you all have a fantastic weekend ahead! :cool:
     
  10. bigbear0083

    bigbear0083 Content Manager
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    Here is a look at this upcoming week's Global Economic & Policy Calendar-
    [​IMG]
     
  11. bigbear0083

    bigbear0083 Content Manager
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    [​IMG]

    Here are the most anticipated ERs for this upcoming week ahead (I'll also have the weekly earnings calendar posted in here as well once it's out)

    ***Check mark next to the stock symbols denotes confirmed earnings release date & time***

    Monday 10.8.18 Before Market Open:
    NONE.

    Monday 10.8.18 After Market Close:
    NONE.

    Tuesday 10.9.18 Before Market Open:
    [​IMG]

    Tuesday 10.9.18 After Market Close:
    NONE.

    Wednesday 10.10.18 Before Market Open:
    [​IMG]

    Wednesday 10.10.18 After Market Close:
    [​IMG]

    Thursday 10.11.18 Before Market Open:
    [​IMG]

    Thursday 10.11.18 After Market Close:
    [​IMG]

    Friday 10.12.18 Before Market Open:
    [​IMG]

    Friday 10.12.18 After Market Close:
    NONE.
     
  12. bigbear0083

    bigbear0083 Content Manager
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    And as promised here is the most anticipated earnings calendar for this upcoming trading week ahead-
    ($JPM $C $WFC $WBA $DAL $FAST $AZZ $PNC $HELE $CBSH $FRC $SAR $EXFO $VOXX $DAVA)
    [​IMG]

    If you guys want to view the full earnings post please see this thread here-
    And finally for those those of you who missed this last week, here are the most anticipated earnings releases for the month of October 2018-
    ($AMD $NFLX $FB $COST $AMZN $AAPL $TSLA $STZ $LEN $MSFT $SGH $AYI $SQ $BAC $GE $INTC $JPM $TWTR $CLF $T $IQ $SNX $GOO $C $SNAP $PYPL $BA $IBM $V $ROKU $WBA $F $WFC $CAT $UNH $FAST $LRCX $DAL)
    [​IMG]
     
  13. Ramsay

    Ramsay New Member

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    Hi All,
    how do u all think the tech stocks will respond this upcoming week (10/9/18). They were hit hard last week for various reasons (Fed increasing interest rates, Chinese Spy news, money moving to bonds.. etc).
    do you think tech stocks (specifically blue chips) will continue dropping early next week or will they hold/rebound? would you sell off now or buy more?
    thx
     
  14. bigbear0083

    bigbear0083 Content Manager
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  15. Ken34

    Ken34 2017 Stock Picking Contest Winner

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    looks like another week of pain so far lol. spx fiddling with that 50 day quite a bit.
     
  16. anotherdevilsadvocate

    anotherdevilsadvocate Well-Known Member

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    I like ENDP's relative strength.
     
  17. stock1234

    stock1234 2017 Stock Picking Contest Winner

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    Heavy selling for tech again :eek: Bonds market is actually closed today due to holiday, will be interesting to see how bonds will be trading tomorrow
     
  18. bigbear0083

    bigbear0083 Content Manager
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    for anyone wondering how the markets (SPX) usually perform a year after a midterm election year.

    interestingly, since 1946, it has a perfect 18 for 18 record of ending higher :eek:

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. stock1234

    stock1234 2017 Stock Picking Contest Winner

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    XHB trying to avoid another down day, looks like it is just barely down now :eek: Utilities, real estates, and staples are actually up today despite you would think they shouldn’t be doing that well in rising rates environment :p
     
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  20. stock1234

    stock1234 2017 Stock Picking Contest Winner

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    Also looks like the value ETF is actually flat or even up for the day, value outperforming growth for sure for the last few sessions
     

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